God Guarding Us


Moon, Venus and Jupiter

Moon, Venus and Jupiter (Photo credit: harshanm)

A mother and her four-year-old daughter were preparing to retire for the night. The child was afraid of the dark and the mother, all alone with the child, was fearful herself. When the light was out, the child got a glimpse of the moon outside the window. “Mommy,” she asked, “is the moon God‘s light?”

“Yes,” said the mother, “and God’s lights are always shining.”

The next question was, “Will God put out His light and go to sleep too?”

“No, my child. God never goes to sleep.”

Then out of the simplicity of a child’s faith, the little one said something which reassured the fearful mother, “Well,’ she said, “as long as God is awake, I am not afraid.”

As poets and psalmists have said: “The Lord is in His heavens, and all’s well with the earth.”

— after William Barclay

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Opportunity


There is a strange Greek statue which has disappeared completely. But it could be reconstructed today from a stone inscription which used to be the base on which the statue stood. That inscription is a very unusual one: it makes the statue talk to you while you are reading the text.

Here is what is says:

Formerly part of the Borghese collection ; pur...

Formerly part of the Borghese collection ; purchased in 1807. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“What is your name, O statue?”

“I am called OPPORTUNITY.”

“Who made you?”

Lysippus.”

“Why are you standing on your toes?”

“To show how quickly I pass by.”

“Why is your hair so long on your forehead?”

“So that people may hold on to me when they meet me.”

“Why, then, is your head so bald in the back?”

“To show that when I have once passed, I cannot be caught.”

“And what is your name again?”

“OPPORTUNITY.”

— after Aesop

“Therefore, as we have opportunity, let us do good to all people, especially those who belong to the family of believers.” (Galatians 6:10)

Wooden Indian or Wooden Christian?


English: "Cigar store Indian" outsid...

English: “Cigar store Indian” outside of a tobacco shop in Long Beach, California. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Aunt Sophie, a converted scrub woman, used to say that she had been called to scrub floors and to preach. Wherever she went, she would tell others of Christ the Savior.

Someone made fun of her once by remarking that she had been seen some time ago talking about Christ to the wooden Indian statue standing in front of the cigar store.

Sophie’s reply was, “Perhaps I did. My eyesight is not so good. But talking about Christ to a wooden Indian is not as bad as being a wooden Christian who never talks to anybody about Christ.”

— after William Barclay

If this story hit home, as it did to me, then it’s time we become witnesses (or better witnesses) for God. In my daily prayers, I ask God guide my thoughts, words, and deeds – that in all these things I honor Him and I serve as a testimony to the people around me of God’s grace and love.

“And He said to them, ‘Go into all the world and proclaim the gospel to the whole creation.'” (Mark 16:15)

Pain Does Good


Shaun the Sheep

Shaun the Sheep (Photo credit: Diva Sian)

A lady tourist was visiting mountainous Switzerland. One day, she waked up to a sheep pasture on a hillside. There sat a shepherd with his flock of sheep lying at rest around him. Nearby on a little pile of grass lay a sheep which seemed to be in pain. It was; it had a broken leg. The lady asked the shepherd, “How did it happen?”
To her amazement, he answered, “Missus, I broke that sheep’s leg myself.” He went on to explain, “Of all the sheep in this flock, that one was the most disobedient; it would never obey my voice. It always wandered off and led the rest of the flock astray. I had had this problem before, so I knew how to cure it. I broke its leg to save it and my other sheep.”
“On the first day, I went to it with food and it tried to bite me. I left it alone for a few days and it got hungry. Then I went back to it. Now it not only takes the food but licks my hand as well.”
“Let me tell you something; when this sheep is well again – as it soon will be – it will be the model sheep of the flock. No sheep will hear my voice more quickly. None will follow so closely at my side.”

— Bert Balling

Why are we so afraid of pain? Or to be more exact, the possibility of incurring pain? When I was around 10 years old, my father taught me how to ride a bike. After three lessons, I did successfully learn how to ride a bike. But while he was teaching me, there was one thing he said which I never forgot. He said that it’s okay to fall from the bike and that I SHOULD fall. I was like, are you crazy? My goal is NOT to fall from the bike. Then he said, If you never experience falling off a bike, you would always be afraid of falling. But if you fall, then you learn how to fall properly, and you will not be afraid of falling anymore because you have seen that it’s not as bad as it looks.

Sure, getting hurt is no fun at all. It’s a pain in the ass. But pain makes us stronger, physically, mentally, emotionally, spiritually.

“Dear friends, do not be surprised at the painful trial you are suffering, as though something strange were happening to you. But rejoice that you participate in the suffering of Christ, so that you may be overjoyed when His glory is revealed.” (1 Peter 4:12-13)


God knows best…

Morning Story and Dilbert

A boy once said to God, “I know what I want when I grow up.” He
proceeded to give God his list: to live in a big house with two
Saint Bernard’s; to marry a tall, blue-eyed woman; to have three
sons-one who will be a senator, one a scientist, and the other
a quarterback.

He also wanted to be a mountain climber and drive a red Ferrari.
As it turned out, the boy hurt his knee one-day while playing
football. He could no longer climb trees, much less mountains. He
married a beautiful and kind woman who was short with brown eyes.
Because of his business, he lived in an apartment in the city and
usually rode the subway. He had three loving daughters, and they
adopted a fluffy cat.

One daughter became a nurse, one an artist and the third a music
teacher. One morning the man awoke…

View original post 64 more words

Little Sins


Stones

Stones (Photo credit: rkramer62)

Two sinners visited a holy man and asked his advice. “We have done wrong,” they said, “and our conscience is troubled. What must we do to be forgiven?”

“Tell me of your wrongdoing, my sons,” said the old man.

The first man said, “I have committed a great and grievous sin.”

The second man said, “I have done some small things, nothing much to worry about.”

“All right,” said the saint. “Go and bring me a stone for each sin.”

The first man came back with a big boulder. The second man cheerfully brought a bag of small stones.

“Now,” said the old man, “go and put them all back where you found them.”

The first man lifted the rock and staggered back to the place where he had gotten it. The second man could not remember where half the stones belonged to, so he just gave up. It was too much like work.

“Sins are like these stones,” said the old man. “If a man commits a great sin, it is like a heavy stone on his conscience. But with true sorrow it is removed completely. But the man who is constantly committing small sins which he knows to be wrong, gets hardened to them and feels no sorrow. So he remains a sinner.

“So you see,  my sons,” concluded the old saint, “it is as important to avoid little sins as well as the big ones.”

— Tony Castle

Repent, then, and turn to God, so that your sins may be wiped out, that times of refreshing may come from the Lord.” (Acts 3 : 19)

Christ in People


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A Portuguese novel tells the story of  a young man who travelled to the Indies to seek a fortune, and in a few years, returned to Lisbon with several ships laden with wealth.

“Now,” he thought, “I’ll play a trick on my relatives.” He put on some worn-out clothes and went round to see his cousin Pedro.

“Here I am, your cousin John. After some years in India, I have come back home. You see how I am fixed… Could I stay at your house for a time?”

“Oh, my dear John, how I wish I could put you up. Unfortunately, there isn’t a room free in my house.”

John went round to another friend, and another, but everywhere he found the door closed against him.

Then he returned to his ships, got into his best clothes, and sailed into town with a dozen servants attending him. He bought a large mansion right on the main street of Lisbon. Within a few weeks his fabulous wealth was the talk of the town.

“Who could have imagined it?” said his friends and relatives who had given him the brush-off. “If we had only known, how differently we would have acted. But now we have spoiled our chances with him forever.”

Our Lord comes to us every day in the guise of those who need our help… How do we respond?

The Ten Most Wanted Men


River of gold

Image by Steve-h via Flickr

The man who tries to be the right example to every child,

rather than talk about it.

The man who has a passion to help,

rather than a passion to be helped.

The man who is willing to say, “I was wrong, I’m sorry.”

The man who will look at temptation squarely and say, “No.”

The man who puts God‘s business above any other.

The man who throws himself totally into a project,

then give the credit for its success to his helpers.

The man who has a ready smile and a pat on the back for others.

The man who brings his children to church

rather than sending them.

The man who can see his own faults

before he sees the faults of others.

The man who gives his money, time and talent

without thought of them.

— Gems of Thought