‘The Kite Runner’ Will Blow You Away


When a co-teacher of mine first mentioned the book “The Kite Runner” to me, I wasn’t immediately thrilled with the concept of the book. Being a rather “conservative” reader, I tend to steer clear of books that contain emotionally draining, graphic scenes. But I had no choice, so to speak, but to read this book when it was given to me as a birthday present. And read it I did and so much more. “The Kite Runner” not only opened my eyes to a different world, a different culture, it changed the way I looked at the world around me.
Hauntingly beautiful and sad at the same time, “The Kite Runner” follows the lives of Amir and Hasaan, best friends, brothers, torn apart by the war in Afghanistan and the eventual occupation of the Taliban. It’s a story within a story, as I would like to put it. In the outer shell, we have the situation in Afghanistan providing the dramatic backdrop of the story. In the inner shell, it follows the story of Amir and Hassan, two boys – one born into privilege, the other born into poverty and discrimination – from the time when they were innocent boys playing in the streets of Kabul, to the impact of the devastating war, to their separation, and to their “reunion”. I don’t really want to give away too much of the story, as this is a book that MUST be read, and not merely summarized.
A fellow book lover once asked me, “Maybs, kanino ka mas naawa, kay Amir o kay Hasaan?” (“Maybs, who did you sympathize with more, Amir or Hasaan?”) I answered, “Well, pareho. (Well, both.) In a sense, all both of them ever wanted was to be loved. Remember, in the earlier parts of the book, it was said there that Amir’s first word was ‘Baba’ (meaning, ‘Father’), while Hasaan’s was ‘Amir’. These two words laid the foundation of the events that happened. For me, that pretty much sums up the whole book for me.”
“The Kite Runner” presents a myriad of contemporary issues, but the one thing that struck me in this book is, however different our circumstances might me, whatever culture we grew up in, there is one thing we all have in common – and that is, the desire to be loved and accepted.


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